Can your business afford not to record calls?

Can your business afford not to record calls?

Businesses are always in search of cost-effective ways to better understand the needs of their customers. They review analytics and compare results in order to identify the level of overall customer satisfaction, and to identify any gaps in business performance.    Whilst satisfaction ratings and sales figures are the most common and obvious way to monitor the success of a business, it is also important to observe customer-facing employees in action. This is where call recording systems can come into play.    Recording customer calls enables businesses to monitor any interaction between its employees and its customers. This allows for the easy identification of certain areas of the business which may need to be improved, or any persistent problems that customers are experiencing with a particular product or service.   Call recording enables businesses to provide employees with feedback as to how they are dealing with customers whilst providing managers with an opportunity to help teams improve phone etiquette and communication skills. By monitoring calls, managers can provide effective selling tips to its employees and advise how to improve the care and support offered to customers.    Monitoring the information gathered from call recordings can help a business to steer its marketing efforts in the right direction and adjust its strategy accordingly.    It can also help a business to comply with any legal, industry, and service-level compliance guidelines, and can be especially beneficial when resolving a dispute with an unhappy customer. With proof of the exchange, a business may be able to save both time and money.     It is common for both customers and businesses to be wary of using call recording software due to the confidential and sensitive information often shared.    If a business makes it clear to its customers what the purpose of the recording is, whether to monitor potential problems or as a tool for training and employee improvement,...
Do I actually need a physical desk phone?

Do I actually need a physical desk phone?

It is common in modern homes these days to find that there isn’t a physical phone installed. Rather, people are opting to rely solely on their mobile phone. However, should the same be the case in businesses? Is it time do away with the desk telephone?  There are of course advantages for retaining the physical phone in the workplace but this will depend largely on the nature of the business itself. In some organisations, the entire working day may be spent at a desk without any requirement for staff to be contactable outside normal hours, so a landline phone makes sense.  Take another company, where employees spend a lot of time away from the office and are spread over several locations, and the challenge is to keep them connected.  Relying solely on a desk phone will render this impossible.  Tempting as it is to think the best answer is to switch entirely to mobile, there are much more suitable solutions that provide fully-integrated communications that improve not only operational efficiency but vastly enhance the customer experience.  Utilising advances in technology coupled with the internet can allow organisations to manage all their communications as a single unit, rather than an array of phones and other devices.  Using a Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) system, business users can use any device under their control, be it a mobile, tablet or laptop, to make a call as if they were using their desk phone.  They can also choose to do so using a single telephone number. We are already used to sending an email from a single address but from a variety of devices – now we can do the same with a phone number.   There are significant pros for inbound calls also. Rather than clients...
Do you really need a telephone system at all?

Do you really need a telephone system at all?

How often have you heard someone in business say ‘I use my mobile for everything’ and then ask whether or not they really need a telephone system at all?  It’s certainly one of the most common points of discussion when I meet with perspective clients, particularly those operating at a micro or small business level.  And in an era of the smart phone and what appears to an infinite number of applications, it is of course a fair question.  There are a number of important considerations to be made before arriving at an answer, however.  For instance, do you and those in your business make many outbound calls, and do you often share calls with more than one person?  Further, do you have a requirement to maintain a record of the calls you make, or are made to you, and do your sales depend on a single number?  If the answer to all these questions is no, then a number management system could be considered.  Such a system, which is particularly suited to smaller businesses, enables a telephone number or set of phone numbers to be hosted in the cloud to be routed to any set of phone numbers or other IP devices.  What does this mean for businesses? First of all, it may take a shift in thinking about what the function of the telephone number is.  A telephone number could be considered a digital address for the business – similar to an email or website address.  Then how do you want calls to that number – and your business – to be managed?  Take the example of a plumber operating from their van with just a mobile phone. He or she can only take calls when they are physically present with the phone, but what happens when they miss a call, or receive voice mails or perhaps emails that go...